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Best Cameras

Best Camera: 15 best cameras you can buy





There’s no shortage of choice for camera buyers. Those who say phones have already killed the dedicated camera are getting ahead of themselves.
We review everything from fun and casual cameras to DSLRs and advanced system cameras that cost thousands, and have simmered down all our research to this easy-to-digest list of recommendations. There’s something for everyone here.
To find out which cameras made it, you can use the dropdown menu, or hit the next arrow to navigate the list now.

Best Camera Buying Guide – What’s the right camera for you?

Generally you need to think about two things when you’re buying a camera: how much you’re able to spend and how you’re going to use it. It’s a tough choice if you’re new to camera buying, so here’s a quick guide to the different types of camera you can buy.

Best Compacts and Bridge Cameras

If you’re looking for the best cameras for casual use and don’t want to fuss about with settings before hitting the shutter button, a compact camera is probably the best fit for you. There are still plenty of cheap and cheerful compacts out there, but higher-end models also cater for the enthusiast.
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The Fujifilm X100F is a good example of a fixed lens compact
There are numerous kinds of quality compacts, too. You’ll find chunkier advanced compacts that give you good manual control, and simpler ones that focus on providing a higher-end sensor and lens optics for better image quality and ease of use.
Bridge cameras are something between a compact camera and an interchangeable-lens system camera. They have permanent, generally very long zoom lenses and a similar feel to a DSLR. Though they’re not compact in size, they are very versatile and well suited to photographing a wide variety of subjects.

Best Mirrorless Cameras

Bridging the gap between compact cameras and DSLRs are mirrorless cameras, also referred to as compact system cameras (CSC). Expect these types to offer an excellent balance of convenience and image quality, though at the very top end we’re beginning to see mirrorless cameras match or even exceed rival DSLRs. Sony’s full-frame A7-series is a good example.
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Sony FE 12-24mm F4 G

The Sony A7R II is a popular and highly-regarded mirrorless camera
Within the CSC category, there’s a number of different types of sensor used, each giving quite a different experience. Nikon’s CSCs use 1-inch sensors that provide lightning-fast shooting and dinky camera bodies, but are not the best for low-light performance and don’t achieve a shallow depth of field for blurring the background or foreground. Olympus and Panasonic use Micro Four Thirds-size sensors, providing a middle ground and some outstanding and affordable lenses.

The largest sensors you’ll find in affordable CSCs are APS-C ones, used in cameras from Fujifilm and Sony. Of course, Sony has now gone even further, adopting full-frame sensors in the top-end A7-series. These provide the best image quality among CSCs, rivalling pro DSLRs.

Best DSLRs

DSLRs remain the professional’s choice. While CSCs compete well in the consumer market, professionals who need top-quality lenses, a reliable performance and excellent build quality still mainly use DSLRs.
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DSLRs are still the no.1 choice for many photographers
This is particularly true for full-frame cameras, where Nikon and Canon both offer some outstanding options. There are some good entry-level DSLRs as well, though, so there’s plenty of choice and a huge number of lenses to invest in.
In this roundup you’ll find all the best DSLR’s, mirrorless and compact cameras grouped together with links to each camera’s in-depth review.

1. Fujifilm X-T2

A stunning camera perfect for enthusiast photographers
Type: Mirrorless | Sensor size: APS-C CMOS | Resolution: 24.3MP | Lens: Fujifilm X mount | Viewfinder: EVF | Screen type: 3.0-inch tilting screen, 1,040,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 8fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Intermediate/expert
Polished handling
Fast autofocus
No touchscreen
Not much else

The update to the X-T1 may look similar at first glance, but there have been some huge improvements made to Fujifilm's follow-up flagship mirrorless camera. Perhaps the biggest update though is the autofocus. A huge leap forward compared with the system found in the X-T1, AF tracking of moving subjects is very snappy, while the level of sophistication and customisation is impressive. Add in 8 frames per second burst shooting, a clever double-hinged rear display, bright EVF, Fujifilm's excellent 24.3MP X Trans III CMOS sensor and plenty of body mounted controls and you're left with one of the best cameras available today.

2. Canon EOS 5D Mark IV

One of the most complete DSLRs we've seen
Type: DSLR | Sensor size: Full-frame CMOS | Resolution: 30.4MP | Lens: Canon EF mount | Viewfinder: Optical | Screen type: 3.2-inch touchscreen, 1,620,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 7fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Expert
Stunning performance
Advanced AF system
Expensive compared to rivals
4K video options limited
Canon's EOS 5D series of cameras has a rich heritage – the original EOS 5D bought full-frame DSLR photography to the masses, the Mark II unleashed Full HD video capture for the first time on a DSLR, and while the Mark III became a firm favourite amongst photographers. The EOS 5D Mark IV pretty much tweaks and improves on everything before it. With a new 30.4MP sensor that delivers pin-sharp results through the ISO range, a 61-point AF system that's incredibly advanced and some very polished handling, the EOS 5D Mark IV has to be one of the best DSLRs we've seen. 

3. Nikon D500

Blistering performance perfect for action photography
Type: DSLR | Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Resolution: 20.9MP | Lens: Nikon F mount (DX) | Viewfinder: Optical | Screen type: 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen, 2,359,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 10fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Expert
Stunning 173-point AF system
Rugged, metal body
Relatively low pixel count
Video still limited
Nikon has taken their flagship D5 DSLR and most of its high-end features and distilled all of this into a smaller, but still very durable metal body. The full-frame sensor is replaced by an 20.9MP APS-C sized chip, so it hasn't got quite the same resolving power as the D7200, but the small sacrifice in resolution is worth it for a number of reasons. ISO performance is brilliant, with an expanded setting that hits an equivalent of ISO1,640,000, while it can rattle off a burst of 200 raw shots at 10fps. That's not forgetting the 153-point AF system that is perhaps the best autofocus system out there right now. A brilliant all-rounder, it excels at fast action like sports and wildlife photography.

4. Sony Alpha A9

Taking the fight to Canon and Nikon
Type: Mirrorless | Sensor size: Full-frame CMOS | Resolution: 24.2MP | Lens: Sony E mount | Viewfinder: EVF | Screen type: 3.0-inch tilting touchscreen, 1440,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 20fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Expert
Blistering performance
Incredibly fast AF
Limited touchscreen controls
No XQD card slots
Once, if you wanted a professional quality full frame camera it had to be a Nikon or Canon DSLR. Sony's growing range of mirrorless full-frame cameras offer a great alternative and the Alpha A9 sits at the top of the range. The AF system Sony has blessed this camera with is not only incredibly quick, the tracking performance needs to be seen to be believed. Partner that with incredibly fast 20fps burst shooting, and a large and bright EVF that doesn't blackout when you're shooting, and you've got a camera that can mix it with the best that Canon and Nikon have to offer when it comes to shooting action. The Alpha A9 doesn't fail to impress.

5. Nikon D3400

Not the most expensive entry-level DSLR, but we think it's the best
Type: DSLR | Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Resolution: 24.2MP | Lens: Nikon F mount (DX) | Viewfinder: Optical | Screen type: 3.0-inch screen, 921,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 5fps | Movies: 1080p | User level: Beginner
Good image quality
Guide mode
Fixed screen
No touchscreen
Nikon's D3400 builds on the brilliant D3300 and is our top pick when it comes to entry-level DSLRs. Sharing pretty much the same design and specification as its predecessor, the D3400 adds Nikon's SnapBridge bluetooth connectivity to transfer images directly to your smart device to make it that much easier to share images. The 24.2MP sensor resolves bags of detail, while the D3400 is also a very easy camera to live with. Its clever Guide Mode is a useful learning tool that gives real-time explanations of important features. There's no touchscreen, but otherwise, this is our favorite entry-level DSLR right now.

6. Fujifilm X100F

Classic design and controls make it the perfect enthusiast compact
Type: High-end compact | Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Resolution: 24.3MP | Lens: 23mm f/2 | Screen type: 3-inch, 1,040,000 dots | Viewfinder: Hybrid | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 8fps | Movies: 1080p | User level: Expert
Hybrid viewfinder
Excellent image quality
ISO dial not that practical
1080p video only
The X100F is a thing of beauty both to look and and to use, but it's not for everyone. It's a relatively large, retro-styled compact camera with a fixed focal length 35mm equivalent f/2.0 lens, and designed for photographers who hanker after the weighty feel and manual external controls of traditional 35mm film rangefinder cameras. It's a relatively specialised camera and most owners are likely to have other cameras too. It may be a touch pricey, but there's nothing quite like it – it's an exquisite camera to look at and to shoot with.

7. Olympus OM-D E-M10 II

Top-notch performance in a super-small package
Type: Mirrorless | Sensor size: MFT Live MOS | Resolution: 16.1MP | Lens: Micro Four Thirds | Screen type: 3.0-inch tilting touchscreen, 1,370,000 dots | Viewfinder: EVF | Maximum continuous shooting rate: 8.5fps | Movies: 1080p | User level: Beginner/enthusiast
Compact proportions
5-axis stabilisation
Smaller sensor than some
Battery life could be better
We loved the original E-M10 for its size, versatility and value for money, but the E-M10 II adds features that take it to another level. The old camera's 3-axis image stabilization system has been uprated to the 5-axis system in Olympus's more advanced OM-D cameras, the viewfinder resolution has been practically doubled and the continuous shooting speed, already impressive at 8fps, creeps up to 8.5fps. Some will criticise the smaller Micro Four Thirds sensor format (roughly half the area of APS-C) but the effect on image quality is minor and it means that the lenses are as compact and lightweight as the camera itself. It's small, but it's no toy – the E-M10 II is a properly powerful camera.

8. Panasonic Lumix ZS100 / TZ100

The perfect travel camera - small, versatile and with a decent zoom
Type: Travel compact | Sensor: 1-inch type CMOS | Resolution: 20.1MP | Lens: 25-250mm, f/2.8-5.9 | Viewfinder: EVF | Screen type: 3.0-inch, 1,040,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 10fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Beginner/enthusiast
1-inch type sensor
4K movies
Limited 10x zoom
Touchscreen would be nice
Similar in size to earlier ZS/TZ-series cameras, Panasonic however has managed to squeeze a much larger sensor into the ZS100 (TZ100 outside the US). This enables the pixels to be about 2.4x bigger than they are in models like the Lumix ZS70 / TZ90, and this helps the ZS100 produce much higher quality images. The zoom lens isn't quite so extensive though, but you still get an electronic viewfinder that makes it easier to compose images in bright sunny conditions and in addition to 4K video recording, there's Panasonic's 4K Photo mode to help capture 8MP images of fleeting moments. It all adds up to be a powerful 

9. Canon EOS Rebel T7i / 800D

Canon's best entry-level DSLR yet offers power and performance
Type: DSLR | Sensor: APS-C CMOS | Resolution: 24.2MP | Lens: Canon EF-S | Viewfinder: Optical | Monitor: 3.0-inch vari-angle touchscreen, 1,040,000 dots | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 6fps | Movies: 1080p | User level: Beginner
Polished handling
Vari-angle touchscreen
Only 95% viewfinder coverage
Plastic finish
One of the best entry-level DSLRs out there, the EOS Rebel T7i (known as the EOS 800D outside) is an update to the EOS Rebel T6i / 750D. The resolution stays the same, but it's a new design with an improved high ISO performance. The autofocus also gets a boost over the older model, now with a 45-point arrangement that's backed up by excellent live view AF system that's as quick as mirrorless rivals, while the newly designed graphical interface will certainly make this camera even more appealing to new users. The absence of 4K video and the quality of the exterior materials disappoint, but despite this the EOS Rebel T7i / 800D is a great entry into the world of DSLR photography.

10. Panasonic Lumix FZ2000 / FZ2500

The bridge camera for the photographer who wants quality too
Type: Bridge camera | Sensor: 1.0-inch type CMOS | Resolution: 20.1MP | Lens: 24-480mm, f/2.8-4.5 | Screen type: 3-inch vari-angle screen, 1,040,000 dots | Viewfinder: EVF | Maximum continuous shooting speed: 12fps | Movies: 4K | User level: Intermediate/expert
Large 1-inch sensor
Super-fast AF
Big, heavy and not cheap
No weather-sealing
Our final camera is a 'bridge' camera, a type of camera that we don't normally like very much because the ultra-zoom design forces the makers to use titchy 1/2.3-inch sensors the same size as those in point-and-shoot cameras. You get the look and feel of a DSLR, but you certainly don't get the image quality. But the Panasonic Lumix FZ2000 (known as the FZ2500 in the US) is different. It sacrifices a huge zoom range in favour of a much larger 1.0-inch sensor - a compromise most serious photographers will applaud. While the zoom tops out at 480mm equivalent, which is relatively short for a bridge camera, that's still plenty for all but the most extreme everyday use. We'd certainly sacrifice a little for of zoom range for better and faster optics. We love the FZ2000 because it delivers both image quality and zoom range, while also offering full manual and semi-manual controls, the ability to shoot raw files and 4K video.

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